The First Ever YA Book?

17th summer

Margaret Daly was seventeen herself when she started writing ‘Seventeenth Summer’. Written by a young adult specifically for the newly-recognised ‘teenager’ audience, this is widely recognised as the first real YA book.

Romance being timeless, the book was last reissued in 2010. It’s available, with a whopping 4.3 star rating, on Amazon.com, and Amazon.co.uk too.

Here’s the blurb:

A summer to remember…

Angie always thought high school romances were just silly infatuations that come and go. She certainly never thought she would fall in love over one short summer. But when she meets Jack, their connection is beyond any childish crush. Suddenly, Angie and Jack are filling their summer with stolen moments and romantic nights. But as fall grows closer, they must figure out if their love is forever, or just a summer they’ll never forget.

While the romance is pretty chaste and pure, the book was tutted at for portraying teenage desire, smoking and underage drinking! Tut-tut, indeed. You won’t find any of that in my books (she says with her fingers crossed under the table).

And here’s the new cover:

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There’s just something about that old cover though… Which one do you prefer?

The Curtain Twitcher’s Handbook: Tip #2

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‘The Importance of a Darkened Room’ by Daisy May

It may seem obvious but, at night, curtain-twitching should only be attempted in a darkened room. So many of us forget in our haste and are discovered.

I looked down at the tissue in my hand. It was a damp, wrinkled ball full of tears and snot, and looked exactly like I felt. I stood up to toss it into the spotty bin that matched my curtains.

My curtains.

Still here,” the God of Curtain-Twitching reminded me.

I silently protested.  “But you show me only bad things.”

I only show you what is there,” came the response, which I thought was a bit of a cop-out.

Sighing, I reached over to turn my bedside light off and headed for the window. I heard the god murmur with satisfaction.

 


Taken from The Curtain-Twitcher’s Handbook, in which Daisy discovers the dying art of curtain-twitching is not just for old, nosy people.

The Curtain Twitcher’s Handbook on Amazon.co.uk

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The Curtain Twitcher’s Handbook on Amazon.com

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INSPIRATION: The Saturday Girl

I was a Saturday Girl once. There was a small cafe in our small town, made popular by a long-running TV series. So many girls from school undertook their job-baptism of fire here, and the kitchen was a seething microcosm of alliances, hostilities and hormones, interspersed with coke floats and cheese and pickle sandwiches.

Saturday Girl

INSPIRED

They pushed me to the top of the stairs and handed me a torch.

“Go on,” said the girl called Suzanna, “They’re on the top shelf.”

I peered down. It was pitch black at the bottom. The light from the cafe filtered down, reducing with every step. I flicked the torch on and gritted my teeth.

This was clearly the beginning of some kind of war.

“Come on, new girl.”

An hour into the job and I was already losing.

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